Health



 

!! Xylitol the Silent Killer !!


this product is a naturally occurring sugar substitute. When refined it can be deadly to dogs, causing liver & organ failure.

It is found in sweets, toothpaste, & medications. It has recently been discovered that manufacturers of veterinary medications have been using it to make tablets more palatable.

Please, please, please, read all labels, & ask your vet more questions about your medications.

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Crested are mostly an extremely healthy breed & with the right testing & careful breeding choices a lot of these diseases can be almost eliminated.

PRCD

Progressive Rod Cone Degeneration,occurs when the nitric cells that receive light & transmit to the brain as vision degenerate causing blindness.In later photoreceptor degeneration, (PRCD),the retina matures & functions apparently normally for varying periods before degenerating.Dogs are not usually clinically affected until after 1 year of age. There is a DNA test available to determine if the dog has/or is clear of developing PRCD.

Optigen Laboratories perform these tests.  www.optigen.com

There is no treatment for either PRCD or PRA.

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PRA

Progressive Retinal Atrophy is a slow death of the retinal tissue. It is a slow disease & the earliest signs may be overlooked. Different breeds of dogs have variations in age. The incidence in Cresteds is usually late onset..from about 5 years of age. PRA has been seen in almost every registered breed & mixed breed. This condition in humans is called RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA.  the disease, is passed from parents to offspring, which is why testing is essential to control the spread of this disease. Annual tests are needed to be performed for this type of PRA.

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  CHERRY EYE

Cherry eye is the prolapse of the third eyelid. While not life threatening, it DOES need treatment. It is sometimes accociated with trauma to the eye or can be inherited. When the small ligament which anchors the gland in position is weakened the gland prolapses from behind the third eyelid. The gland produces about 30% of tears & Lachrimal gland produces the rest. Dogs that have the gland removed have a much higher risk of developing Dry Eye which is a painful condition requiring lifelong treatment.Tacking the gland back in place reduces this risk, if done by an expert Vet. Opthalmologist. The recurrence rate is 10-15%.

link: www.eyevet.info/cherryeye.htm

 

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CATARACTS

like in humans, Cataracts can occur in dogs. If they are in good health they can be surgically removed with good results.

 

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CLEFT PALATE

A cleft palate can occur in any puppy. It is an opening in the roof of the mouth. Clefts can vary in size & placement. Some are so severe that euthanasia is necessary. Cleft puppies normally die within days if human feeding doesnt start (bottle or tube) since they cant lock onto the nipple to nurse. PLEASE do not let your puppies starve to death. If you choose not to intervene, have the puppies humanely put to sleep.

What must be kept in mind is that if you do decide to rear a pup with cleft palate they will require expensive surgery at around 6 months old.

 


 If you have found this page helpful please take the time to study the page about raw feeding titled Raw Feeding -Dogs Are Carnivores


 

 

 



               


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